Student accommodation in Denmark

Whether you are an exchange student for one semester or are taking a full degree in Denmark, one of the first things you should do after you are admitted is to start looking for accommodation.

In Denmark, on-campus student accommodation provided by universities and colleges is not available, as is the case in many other countries. This means that students are responsible for finding housing on their own. However, at most of VIA’s campuses, exchange students are offered housing assistance. Contact the international coordinator at the exchange programme you are attending to learn more.

Find lots of information and great tips for finding student accommodation in Denmark below!

Meet Catalin and Ginta and see where they live!

Ginta and Catalin are international students at VIA in Horsens. In this video, you can meet them to see examples of student accommodation in Denmark. (Note: these are examples of student housing in Denmark, prices and availability varies from city to city).

Student accommodation types

There are multiple accommodation options for international students close to VIA's campuses:

Dormitories or residence halls

Or kollegie, as they are called in Danish. An affordable option often located close to educational institutions. Dormitories offer a private room, some have shared facilities such as kitchen and/or bathroom, while others are actually more like small studio apartments. Sometimes available furnished. Offer great opportunities for socialising with other students.

Own apartment

Can be rented through a housing association or a private landlord. Offers privacy and the freedom to do what ever you want. Usually, a more expensive option as you have to cover all costs om your own, e.g. utilities.

Shared apartment

Typically, a large apartment where a group of students split the rent and utility expenses. A shared apartment offers many of the same perks as a dormitory – each renter gets their own room, but share a kitchen and bathroom. 

How do I find student accommodation in Denmark?

Once you have narrowed down where you are going to study and which type of student accommodation you are looking for, you are ready to start apartment hunting. Here are our housing suggestions for exchange and full degree students in each of VIA’s campus cities:

  • Exchange students

    When/If accepted you will receive further information about housing options from our Housing Coordinator. We do not guarantee accommodation, but will assist exchange students in finding suitable housing.

    Full degree students

    Full degree students are responsible for finding their own accommodation. The International Coordinator or Student Counsellor at your programme can provide tips on where to look for accommodation.

    Housing suggestions

    • Birk Campus (Students' Village), is only a few minutes' walk from the school. Birk College consists of approximately 250 high-quality flats of various sizes and prices
    • Vibeke and Mads Eg Damgaards Kollegium, Egelunden, (a student residence hall) situated in Birk Centerpark close to the school and AU-IBT (Herning Institute of Business and Technology).This residence hall contains 40 rooms, each sized 45 square meters. Students at students from VIA and AU-IBT have first priority access to these rooms
    • Banegårdspladsen. In the Center of Herning right next to the station, you will find several possibilities for student accommodation 
    • Northcamp is the name of the 170 newest student apartments in Herning. They are between 43 and 50 square metres and are located in the centre of Herning close to shops, cafés, the library etc.
    • A.I. Holms vej in the centre of Herning. Here you will find good student accommodation at reasonable prices
    • Tietgensgade in the centre of Herning. There are 84 flats for young people in the area; these flats are also high quality, and available in different sizes and at varying prices

     
    Sign up for waiting list here: lejehuset.dk
    How to sign up the waiting list (pdf)

    Contact information:
     
    Fruehøjgaard 
    T: +45 91 21 43 44 
    E: post@fruehojgaard.dk
    W: fruehojgaard.dk 
     
    Fællesbo 
    T: +45 96 26 58 58 
    E: post@faellesbo.dk 
    W: faellesbo.dk  

    If you have questions about housing in Herning contact our student counsellors at design.info@via.dk

    Living in Herning

    The Birk area where VIAs campus Herning is located is known for its unique educational environment located right next to businesses and art institutions. Read more about living in Herning. 

  • Exchange students and full degree students

    In Holstebro, both exchange students and full degree students are responsible for finding housing on their own. The International Coordinator or Student Counsellor at your programme can provide tips on where to look for accommodation.

    More information at Studieby Holstebro

    Living in Holstebro

    In Holstebro, you will find both cultural activities, sandy beaches, moor and forests. Read more about Holstebro.

    Holstebro municipality and three building associations have agreed on a residence guarantee for full-time VIA students

     

  • Exchange and full degree students

    In Horsens, both exchange students and full degree students are responsible for finding housing on their own. The International Coordinator or Student Counsellor at your programme can provide tips on where to look for accommodation.

    Housing suggestions

    The youth city of Kamtjatka has room for 300 students and is located near the centre of Horsens. Read more at www.kamtjatka.dk or contact contact@kamtjatka.dk.

    Lilli Gyldenkildes Torv, new student apartments in central Horsens. Contact kolding@lejerbo.dk

    Teknisk Kollegium, affordable student housing about 3 km from campus

    Living in Horsens

    Horsens has a lively cultural atmosphere and is close to nature at the same time. Read more about living in Horsens.

  • Exchange students

    Exchange students will be offered a place to live. You will be informed of the housing application procedure in the introduction material from your exchange programme. If the offered housing option is turned down, the student is responsible for finding an alternative on his/her own.

    Exchange students may contact VIA's housing coordinator at randers.housing@via.dk with housing-related questions.

    Full degree students

    Full degree students are responsible for finding their own accommodation. The International Coordinator or Student Counsellor at your programme can provide tips on where to look for accommodation.

    Housing suggestions

    When moving to Randers, we suggest staying in a student residence hall with your own room and bathroom and shared kitchen facilities. You can find some options at randersbolig.dk.

    Living in Randers

    You can read more about student life and inexpensive student housing in Randers at workandlive.randers.dk

  • Exchange students

    Exchange students will be offered a place to live. If you would like to take advantage of this offer, please contact the International Coordinator or Student Counsellor at your programme. If the offered housing option is turned down, the student is responsible for finding an alternative on his/her own.

    Full degree students

    Full degree students are responsible for finding their own accommodation. The International Coordinator or Student Counsellor at your programme can provide tips on where to look for accommodation. Or go to these rental companies:

    Living in Silkeborg

    Silkeborg is a lively town and campus is located at the centre, while also being close to forests and lakes. 

  • Exchange students

    Exchange students will be offered a place to live. You will be informed of the housing application procedure in the introduction material from your exchange programme. If the offered housing option is turned down, the student is responsible for finding an alternative on his/her own.

    Exchange students may contact VIA's housing coordinator at viborg.housing@via.dk with questions about housing, e.g. about deposit.

    Full degree students

    Full degree students are responsible for finding their own accommodation. The International Coordinator or Student Counsellor at your programme can provide tips on where to look for accommodation.

    Housing suggestions

    VIA recommends staying at Camp Logos, a student dormitory located right next to campus. Camp Logos houses both Danish and international students. Find more information here.

    If you are attending programmes at The Animation Workshop, you can read more about housing options under each programme here, or contact taw.housing@via.dk for assistance.

    Living in Viborg

    Viborg offers both youth programmes and higher education. There is also an Academy of physical education in the city, so Viborg has a lively student environment.

     

  • Exchange students

    In Aarhus, VIA has access to a very limited amount of rooms at the Skjoldhøj dormitory for exchange students for a 6 month period only. You will be informed of the housing application procedure in the introduction material from your exchange programme.

    Exchange students may contact VIA's housing coordinator at aarhus.housing@via.dk with housing-related questions.

    Full degree students

    Full degree students are responsible for finding their own accommodation. The International Coordinator or Student Counsellor at your programme can provide tips on where to look for accommodation.

    Other housing suggestions

    The following are suggestions with private vendors and VIA does not facilitate contact:

    Useful websites when looking for housing in Aarhus:

    Living in Aarhus

    Aarhus is Denmark’s second-biggest city and a popular place to study. Thousands of international students come to Aarhus each year to study at VIA University College and the other educational institutions in Aarhus. This creates a lively international atmosphere in the city, where it is easy to meet people with similar interests. Read more about Aarhus.

  • Other websites to look for accommodation, both housing associations and private landlords:

    • Danmarkbolig.dk
    • Boligportalen.dk
    • Lejerbo.dk
    • Lejebolig.dk
    • Facebook – often students who are graduating will post available rooms in shared apartments and the like in Facebook groups, e.g. Bolig i Herning
    • dba.dk – a portal for selling used things, but sometimes people post apartments here as well

Frequently asked questions about housing in Denmark

Get the answers to all the questions you have about accommodation in Denmark and important things to be aware of! 

  • Yes, foreigners/internationals can rent accommodation in Denmark. You may have to present a residence permit or student Visa, and could also be asked to present proof that you are able to pay the rent. Other than that, foreigners can rent on the same terms as Danes. Note that terms may vary depending on whether you are a citizen of the EU or come from outside of the European Union, as is also the case for residence permit and Visa. Buying property can be more difficult for foreigners.

  • The housing costs in Denmark vary greatly depending on the type of accommodation (apartment, room, recidence hall) and the location. Large cities such as Aarhus and Copenhagen are typically much more expensive than smaller cities and towns such as Viborg and Randers. If you are looking for an affordable option in one of the large cities, it may be worth while searching in the suburbs and outskirts. You can always get a bike or a bus card for daily transportation to campus and the city centre. Expect to pay between 3000-6000 DKK per month + utilities. See an example of a student budget here.

  • That depends on who you ask! Compared to many other countries housing in Denmark can be quite expensive. Especially in the large cities where demand is high. However, there are affordable accommodation options for students. Look outside of city centres and in the suburbs for cheaper housing. Expect to pay between 3000-6000 DKK per month + utilities for a one-bedroom apartment depending on location and city – Aarhus being the most expensive of VIA’s campus cities. Residence halls (kollegie in Danish) tend to be a little bit cheaper than that. See an example of a student budget in Denmark here.

  • As soon as possible is the short answer. Preferably at least 3 months before study start, as the housing market in Denmark can be quite difficult, especially around study start in August at February. This means that you may have to start looking for a place, before you know if you have been admitted. Try to make a deal with the landlord to pay your deposit when you have you letter of admission, or that your deposit will be returned if you are not admitted (get that in writing!).

    You have to be in Denmark for study start and if you have not secured a place to stay before then, a temporary place can be okay to give you time to find something more permanent.

  • Yes, most landlords in Denmark requires a deposit when entering a lease. This goes for housing associations as well as private landlords. The amount varies, but is typically 3 months of rent, plus 1 month of prepaid rent to be paid when signing the lease. Ask for a separate receipt and do not pay in cash, as there are known scammers out there. Always make a bank transfer that can be traced in the unlikely case of fraud.

    Deposits are for covering any damage, wear and tear you may have caused during your lease – e.g. new paint, sanding of the floors, etc. So, you may not get all of your deposit money back when vacating the apartment. To avoid any twists, make sure to take pictures of the apartment before you move in and do a thorough check with the landlord when you get the keys.

  • Most apartments in Denmark are un-furnished. However, some residence halls offer furnished rooms/apartments or has furniture available to rent or borrow. If you are looking to furnish your apartment affordably Ikea, Jysk and second hand stores are great places to shop.

  • Yes, some tenants can. The housing benefit is a rent subsidy for which tenants of rented accommodation can apply, if they meet a number of criteria, for example in terms of income and the nature of the rented accommodation. Housing benefits is called 'Boligstøtte' in Danish. Housing benefits are available to everyone with a Danish CPR number. Read more about housing benefits in Denmark.

  • If you want to terminate your lease, you have to notify your landlord in writing – usually three months before you want to move out. Note the termination conditions in your contract. Often, the landlord will carefully check the apartment with you for any damage that may have occurred during your stay there and make a report for you to sign. Damages will be repaired and the costs will be deducted from your deposit.

  • If you are travelling to Denmark from an EU country, as well as Norway and Iceland, you are allowed to bring your cat, dog or ferret if you are accompanying the animal yourself, the animal is microchipped, has an EU pet passport and a valid rabies vaccination. Note that dogs must be registered and you have to have a dog insurance policy and that some dog breeds are illegal in Denmark. Learn more about travelling to Denmark with pets at the Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Fisheries of Denmark.

    Make sure to check whether your accommodation in Denmark allows pets as not all apartments do.
    If you are moving to Denmark and bringing a cat, dog or other pets, you should check your lease carefully. Most rentals in Denmark do not allow pets, but pet-friendly rentals are available. 

  • You should be aware that there are housing scammers on the Danish accommodation market and they are especially active around study start. Take care if you are offered a very cheap apartment in the city centre, a landlord demands that you pay rent/deposit in cash without a written contract or before handing over the key. If an offer sounds too good to be true, it probably is. At lejeloven.dk (in Danish) you find answers to many of the questions regarding the Danish rental law.

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