Research programme in rehabilitation

The research programme in rehabilitation focuses on improving the conditions for people with rehabilitation needs to live a meaningful life based on participation and autonomy.

How we work

In collaboration with students, teachers, professions as well as national and international knowledge and research institutions, we develop application-oriented knowledge of how people with disabilities experience and handle everyday life; and we explore methods and interventions that may support living a meaningful life based on participation and autonomy.

The research group represents different health professions and backgrounds in health and social sciences.

Research areas

We perform feasibility studies, validation studies, effect studies, health economics studies and qualitative studies.

  • Effect of progressive exercise therapy for patients with hip dysplasia
  • Intensity of balance training
  • The effect of occupational therapy interventions
  • Better life with Parkinson's disease
  • Food and meal challenges as well as other nutritional issues
  • Rehabilitation after kidney transplantation, COVID-19, stroke or concussion
  • Delirium as a factor in rehabilitation in the acute phase

Project: Physical training – fitness, strength, and balance

Effect of progressive exercise therapy for patients with hip dysplasia who are not candidates for surgery.

The aim is to investigate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of progressive exercise therapy compared to the current practice for patients with hip dysplasia who are not candidates for surgery.

Efficacy will be investigated in a randomised controlled trial (RCT). In parallel with the RCT trial, a cost evaluation will be carried out, where cost-utility and cost-effectiveness analyses will be conducted from a societal perspective.

Contact

Julie Sandell Jacobsen

Project Manager, physiotherapist, M.Sc., PhD student
T: +45 87 55 23 40
E: jsaj@via.dk

Contact Julie

Project: Effect of balance training measured with fNIRS

The aim of the project is to investigate how cognitive neurological processing related to motor control is affected by balance training. “Functional near-infrared spectroscopy” (fNIRS) is used for detection. It determines the level of activity in the cerebral cortex measured by the consumption of oxygen.

It is hypothesised that better balance leads to a higher degree of automation of movements. This, in turn, will be seen by a reduction in activity in areas of the brain associated with motor control.

Contact

John Brincks

Physiotherapist, M.Sc., PhD.
T: +45 87 55 23 18
E: jobr@via.dk

Contact John

Contact

Jacob Callesen

Physiotherapist, M.Sc., PhD.
T: +45 87 55 23 30 / +45 28 70 00 93
E: jacc@via.dk

Contact Jacob

Previous research projects (extracts)

Intensity of balance training

The aim of the project is to investigate how intensity of balance training is determined and reported in clinical intervention studies on the effect of balance training for patients with multiple sclerosis. In addition, examine whether there is a correlation between the intensity of balance training and the effect measured on functional outcomes.

Food and meal challenges for citizens with COPD

Weight loss is a significant negative factor in the development of the disease and oral nutritional optimisation has been shown to be insufficient in preventing weight loss in citizens with COPD.

The purpose of the project is to gain knowledge on what food and meal challenges citizens with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease experience during hospitalisation and in everyday life.

The effect of occupational therapy interventions on strengthening the problem-solving skills of the elderly

The purpose of the project is to identify and assess the effect of occupational therapy initiatives that, through strengthening problem-solving skills, promote the activity performance of the elderly.

The interventions are described and, if possible, a meta-analysis is carried out. 

Contact Programme in rehabilitation

Portrait of Dorte Sørensen.